Noah’s Ark Park In Kentucky

Noah’s Ark Park is to be built in an as yet to be determined site in the Great State of Kentucky.  Currently an 800 acre site, off of Interstate 75 is being considered, about 40 minutes from Cincinnati .  The cost is estimated to be $150 million, by a  for profit group.  The  ark  itself will be funded by donations.  The purpose is to lend assurance that Noah could have two of every animals on the ark.

Now as I understand the account of Noah’s Ark.  It doesn’t mean like 2 Clydesdale horses and 2 Arab horses.  It would just be 2 horses.  It doesn’t say they were adult animals.  Canines, although we have various breeds. I’m sure there was only one breed.  So I can see having all life forms represented.

But I have strayed from my original thought.  There is a group called “Americans United for Separation of Church and State, (AUSCS) opposing the State of Kentucky giving tax incentives for the project.  Kentucky Governor Steve Beshear states, “bringing new jobs to Kentucky in my top priority”, and that he is “happy about the economic impact this project will have on the Northern Kentucky region.”

First you will have the construction jobs.  Then, according to the sources I have checked.  The park will create approximately 900 permanent jobs, and  have a $214 million economic impact the first year of operation alone.

Regardless what the AUSCS, believes this is a business just as, lets say General Electric decided to build a facility on that 800 acres.  They neither one are a Government entity.  By the way the biggest objection I have heard from the AUSCS is that State funds should not be used for the project because it has a religious theme.  But back to the tax incentive.  Business is Business as long it is a legal entity. I’m sure they would not object if say Disney decided to put in a park and asked for the same tax incentives.

I’m never in favor of tax incentives for business, because I have to make up for the tax revenue lost.  But in these times I can tell you.  After seeing my friends and relatives out of work for over 2 years now,  I would consider it a viable option.  We sure could use those jobs in my area.  If Kentucky doesn’t want them contact me I’m sure my state will gladly give the tax incentives.

Sometimes you just have to look at the big picture  In this case the Benefits of the park far outweigh the petty objections of a few people who probably don’t even live in the area.

That Is How I See It.

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